North Carolina Drought 2008

By now the bad drought the South Eastern United States is experiencing is old news. We are already in stage two [PDF] water restrictions here in Orange County, North Carolina. But today I found a map that blew my mind. North Carolina looks like the worst hit overall than any other state right now. Check this out.
US Drought Map
via: U.S. Drought Monitor, University Nebraska – Lincoln

See that state that is almost completely covered in dark oranges and reds? Yep that’s North Carolina. We’ve got a bad drought going on. Not to belittle other states around us who are suffering too like Tennessee, South Carolina, Alabama, and Georgia. So now check out the close up.
North Carolina Drought Map
Here are the NC archives of this map since 2001.

Soon we may go into stage three water restrictions. But I feel good about our local PUBLICLY owned water and sewer system. Its managed by OWASA. They have planed well and so far we’re not feeling it too bad. I chalk that up to the progressive people in our county that have cared about conservation LONG before it was mandatory. Some real wisdom to be inspired and motivated by.

I found these maps at the NC Drought Management Advisory Council website. Thank you! Such a good way to spend our tax dollars. A website that is actually USEFUL!

Deconstructivist Gehry

Much of my time in between going to art school and washing dishes was spent watching friends become architects. I felt a creative kinship with them. After all I was studying sculpture. A creative style with similar considerations. Basically what do to with three dimensional space. So my formal aesthetic values were seriously influenced by the architectural designs of M and Dave. Thus I am a BIG modern architecture, furniture, and interior design fan.

So when I saw this blog post on WebUrbanist called The House that Shaped an Architectural Generation: Frank Gehry’s First ‘Deconstructivist’ Building I was amazed. I haven’t thought about the word Deconstructivism in a long time.

So what if Gehry’s buildings fall apart and don’t function practically. They are art IMHO. I wish I could make a full size 3-D scan of them, replace them with functional buildings, and paste the art/building into a virtual place where weather and time don’t exist. Not sure if that would be preservation or destruction.

NCSBC 2008: Open Science Session Video

Part 1 of 4Here is around 80 minutes of video I shot at the 2008 North Carolina Science Blogging Conference. This session’s full title is Open Science: how the Web is changing the way science is done, written and published. The discussion leader was Dr.Hemai Parthasarathy (former editor at Nature and PLoS). Because of length and file size I split it up into four parts. Enjoy and please share on your site. You can get the embed code on the blip.tv video pages linked to bellow. I’m working on video for the Blogging public health/medicine session.

NCSBC 2008: Open Science Session
Part 1 of 4

Part 2 of 4

Part 3 of 4

Part 4 of 4

New Press about Carrboro Coworking

There is a good article up at the Carrboro Commons called Carrboro’s Creative Coworking in the works. It covers pretty well what Carrboro Coworking will be all about and where I’m at right now in the process. Its been a amazing trip to get this far. So much more todo. But we’re close to making this biz a reality. Very close.

Thanks to Katie Spencer for writing this. I enjoyed talking with her. She acuratly reported what I said and did a good job of explaining the coworking concept. I find it interesting that the two reporters who have approached me to do stories about Carrboro Coworking have been students. There was another story September 2007 in the Daily Tar Heel called Resident plans shared space for creative work. I think younger people inherently understand the future of mobile work. I don’t think cubicals and big office parks are in their futures.

I have a Carrboro Coworking website with a survey up. Please go take it. If you want to keep up with what’s going on please join the Carrboro Coworking Google Group.